VENEER - THE MATERIAL THAT DESIGNER DREAMS ARE MADE OF

Interior architects and designers are talking about the age of material. Standing somewhere between tradition and innovation, this makes veneer a highly interesting. As an element in design, even after workmanship, veneer retains its natural beauty and visual dynamics. Mindful of natural values, renewable raw materials conducive to healthy living are central to the design of the contemporary living environment. Veneer is therefore Number One in the creation of individual furnishing worlds in both public and domestic spheres. This uniquely produced wooden surface brings nature to our living environment, office or concert hall, to name but a few. Veneer is an absolute guarantee for comfortable living ambience.

INCOMPARABLE DIVERSITY, IRRESISTIBLE NATURAL CHARM

Veneer is wood at its most attractive. Experts in the wood industry regard veneer as the most noble product of wood. You can sense the natural source in each and every veneer. Wood is a naturally grown raw material. Each type of wood has its own characteristics and is distinctive by its decorative features. Every wood grain tells its own story. As no one fingerprint resembles another in the entire world, so does no veneer face. Markings and structure are unique to each individual veneer face, having its own distinct character. Whether visually or to the touch, veneer is a fascinating surface giving ample scope to creative ideas in its application to architectural concepts.

RESOURCES – A PROTECTOR WITH A TENDENCY TOWARDS EXTRAVAGANCE

Veneers are also ecologically remarkable: for it is the most efficient use of wood, capturing the most value out of this natural raw material. And it was this principle which was employed in the original production of veneers. Historically, the Egyptians were using veneering techniques 5,000 years ago. In the Egypt of that era, precious woods were as sought after as they were scarce. Egyptians were therefore forced to work as sparingly as possible. They cut the wood in delicate slices, fixing them to less attractive wood surfaces using glues and fine wooden pegs. Veneered furniture placed as burial objects for Tutankhamen were discovered in 1922 and bear witness to the immense significance of this veneering technique.

FROM EXCLUSIVE MATERIAL TO MASS PRODUCT AND BACK AGAIN

Veneer took a foothold in Europe in the 14th Century. However, the production of veneer was so intricate, that the resulting furniture could only be afforded by the wealthy. It was only in the 19th Century that the industrialised production of veneer began, making it available to the general masses. The triumph of the material was therefore sealed and its popularity has continued unbroken: as an important design element for interiors from floors, ceilings and walls or as finishing for doors to its use in the furniture industry. Despite mass production, veneer has not forfeited any of its natural elegance. And in its exclusivity, veneer is still at the pinnacle: fancy and luxurious demands can be met due to the variety in manufacturing and types of wood.

A LONG WAY TO UNFOLDED BEAUTY

What do butterflies and veneers have in common? Their natural beauty is a given facet right from the outset. However, there is quite a length of time to the definitive stage. With veneer, this begins with the long period of growth of the particular wood. After the preliminary selection of the sawn timber and after purchasing and delivery of the round wood to the veneer plant, a watering system keeps the logs damp in order to retain their elasticity until actual processing. A log is roughly freed of its bark when it first arrives in production. Then, depending on quality and heart cut, the optimum thickness is determined. After the heart cut, the log is pinned back together and steamed or cooked in a steam pit ensuring perfect elasticity for slicing.

Once the log has been steamed, separated again and cleaned, it is sent for slicing. There are two different groups: sliced and rotary-cut veneers. With sliced veneers, veneer faces are cut, one after the other, from the flat side of the log. Rotary-cut veneer faces are taken by working from the outside to the centre of the log. The veneers are then dried and bundled, following which they are pressed. They are then trimmed on all four sides and pre-sorted by our experts.